October 13-14, 2016

Yogyakarta, Indonesia

1st UGM International Conference on South East Asia Studies (ICSEAS) 2016

Today in Southeast Asia, with the decrease of absolute poverty, the question that the region faces is whether a truly plural, equal and democratic society could emerge from the region. Problems arising from increasing fundamentalist beliefs, geopolitical changes resulting from a rising China, climate change and the fragility of the agricultural system, the faltering of democracy in many countries in the region and the increasing gap between the haves and have-nots point to the worrying potential for failing to produce a healthy, equal and multicultural society. These stem from various problems that have yet to be addressed in a measured and deep manner. ICSEAS intends to bring these challenges and the problems it poses to an open forum in a manner in which researchers could exchange their ideas freely in order to fundamentally help put the challenge of the twentieth century for the region in a clear perspective. To create a common and good society based on the ideals of democracy, welfare, equality, pluralism and a respect of the environment requires a deep understanding of the interrelatedness of such an endeavor. Perhaps the major challenge is in convincing such a project to the people of ASEAN.

In order to achieve this goal, the conference is grouped into six separate themes that are related to the overarching theme above on the Southeast Asian challenges in the twenty-first century. These themes are: Pluralism in a Democratic Southeast Asia, Challenges to Democracy, Welfare and Poverty in an Unequal Society, Equality and New Categories of Discrimination, Climate Change and Its Challenges, Food Security and the Future of Southeast Asia, and Challenges to Border Security.

[ Download UGM ICSEAS 2016 Poster ]

Conference Topics

Pluralism in a Democratic Southeast Asia

There have been several debates over issues on the relation between democracy and pluralism. First, debates on pluralism are linked to the issue of democracy and the fulfilment of basic human rights and people’s welfare through equal access to resources. Another debate focuses on the link between pluralism and democracy involving the role of secondary groups (e.g. opposition groups, minority groups) and cross-cutting affiliations between differing groups in inhibiting or supporting democracy. Newer forms of plural identities (e.g. LGBT), and the development of pluralism in various domains (economic pluralism, legal pluralism, religious pluralism, age-based pluralism etc.) is a topic that would be of interest to the conference, especially its relationship with changing Southeast Asian societies in the twenty-first century.

Based on the differing perspectives on pluralism and the development of various forms of pluralism in the present period, this panel seeks to answer questions such as: What links exist between pluralism and democracy? Is pluralism necessary to achieve democracy? What kinds of pluralisms (e.g. economic pluralism, gender pluralism, facilitate/inhibit the formation of a democratic nation? Through what mechanisms do these different kinds of pluralisms allow the formation of a democratic nation? How do pluralist policies advocate equality and citizenship rights to secondary groups? How does Southeast Asia provide a (historical, economic, political, social) context(s) which enables the possibility of pluralism and democracy existing together? How does it support the process of (re)building stronger and stable nation states?

Challenges to Democracy

Challenges to the implementation of democracy have always been significant to every state in Southeast Asia. The rise of national populism, communal conflicts, religious revivalism, terrorism and violent anti-liberal movement against multiculturalism and pluralism point to the fragile state of democracy in the region. Human rights violation, anti-plural movements, the rise of nationalist ideologies all pose challenge to the democratization process. These changes have resulted in a rethinking of the basic value of democracy within many ASEAN countries. As several examples may be drawn: Thailand with its revert back to military rule, the leadership of President Duterte in Philippines, rampant corruption in Indonesia and Malaysia.

Whether the project of liberal democracy and its accoutrements; the creation of vibrant, multicultural societies, the acceptance of new and plural identities (i.e. LGBT, etc.) and the increasing irrelevance of the national identity and its borders are something that is coming to fruition or in fact being undone in Southeast Asia, is a pressing question that needs to be discussed. With the variety of differing national contexts and its histories, the challenge of democracy is also varied and different from one society to the next. This panel is dedicated to draw the kind of democracy that Southeast Asia should develop and the kinds of values that may survive in ASEAN’s twenty-first century are the main questions of the theme.

Welfare and Poverty in an Unequal Society

The Asian Financial Crisis of 1997-1998 brought Southeast Asia to seek for alternative models to promote sustainable and equitable economic growth. Then, the idea of the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) was introduced. The assumption was that the region would achieve economies of scale and increased competitiveness through integration that would benefit everyone in the region. However, the AEC dream is easier said than done, showing that aside from the physical infrastructure, domestic policy reforms in trade, investment climate and labor markets are difficult because national political goals are often at odds.

This specific panel is aimed to gather thoughts on how to overcome those challenges. Specifically, it is expected to contextualize and bring up the various issues related to the region’s economic integration, its difficult implementation in the various states and whether such measures would result in decreasing the widening wealth gap.

Equality and New Categories of Discrimination

The term equality is mostly related but not limited to the issue of gender, economic, racial, and age equality and its forms of discrimination. Yet there are numerous cases of inequality that are outside the legal framework touched upon. The Southeast Asian tendency to provide preferential treatment on seniority bounded with the idea of the wise elders, has resulted in ageism that discriminates against the younger generation. Economic inequality as shown in the rising Gini Coefficient number in all Southeast Asian countries shows greater wealth disparity between the rich and the poor. Along with problem regarding new forms of inequality, such as, new religious movements and identities that originally grew from within the region (i.e. Mama Eden in Indonesia) or outside of the region (i.e. Shiism), new sexual identities (i.e. LGBT), new economic forms of discrimination (i.e. contract labour), and so forth. Thus, the question of equality in Southeast Asia is not merely one of asking what should be done to create equitable conditions, but also what kinds of inequality that are categorically outside of the discussion on the topic. This panel is aimed to explore those categorical rethinking of discrimination and inequality in the context of twenty-first Southeast Asian societies.

Climate Change and its challenges

Despite the richness of environmental resources, South-East Asia countries have been facing a threat to the management of their environment, especially considering environmental degradation under the effect of climate change. In the last 20 years, there has been an acceleration of environmental degradation such as biodiversity loss, pollution, deforestation, extreme drought and flooding, coral reef destruction, urbanization, waste management, etc. due to massive un-sustainable development in this region. Countries in this region are vulnerable to effect of sea-level rise such as increasing heat extremes, tropical cyclones; ocean warming and acidification, as many are archipelagoes located within a tropical cyclone belt and have relatively high coastal population densities. An extreme climatic event such as long drought in Indonesia has brought consequences on the frequent occurrences of peat-fires which cause various health, economic, environmental as well as biodiversity problems. Extreme events will also endanger the livelihood of most people in this region, mainly farmers. Furthermore, countries in this region have been hampered by the fact that understanding the causal factors, effects, and process accelerating environmental degradation under the climate change are still uncertain due to the complexity of tropical ecology. The challenge of the management of environmental degradation under climate change does not only belong to a single country, but needs to be taken seriously together for effective environmental management. Therefore, it is urgently needed to distill the most prominent factors that contribute to environmental degradation under climate change and find effective solutions through various partnerships.

Food Security and the Future of Southeast Asia

Food security has continually emerged as one of the most prominent problems faced by the global community. Food security remains uncertain and unstable at various levels: the national, regional and global level. This has serious impacts, such as the widespread incidence of under nutrition, malnutrition, hunger and possible starvation. One of the causes of food insecurity in many developing countries (including Asian countries) is the conversion of massive amount of agricultural land to accommodate an increasing demand for industrial development, services, housing complexes, public facilities and other purposes. This calls for a strategy that ensures a healthy and productive agricultural sector, including economic and policy changes that support investment in agriculture. These investments include providing support for small-scale farmers to increase local food products and improving modern technologies on farms to improve sustainability – both socially and environmentally. There is also a need for appropriate funding to achieve sustainable agriculture, not only for the purpose of food production, but for income generating and to strengthen the livelihood of rural communities. Another issue that has come to the surface is climate change. Climate change will lead to higher frequency of extreme events such as drought, heat waves, flooding, severe storms and outreaks of plant diseases. Those impacts will in turn threaten food production and farming productivity on a global scale. Strategies of adaptation and mitigation on the impact of climate change is needed including increasing soil carbon sequestration through forestry and agro-forestry initiatives and tillage practices, improving efficiency of nutrient management and restoring degraded lands are among examples of these strategies. This panel seeks to discuss these issues in the Southeast Asian context, and generate ideas that will encourage strategies in achieving food security in Southeast Asia.

Challenges to Border Management

State border in contemporary Southeast Asia is basically a colonial construct in which the application of border maintenance frequently triggers conflict as well as delicate border security threat at border zones such as Abu Sayyaf activities and protracted unrest in Patani. One of the rooted causes is the existing trans-national social space that has been established far before the formation of modern nation-states following decolonization in the 1940s. For trans-national communities, it is the border that shifts around their mobility. On the one hand, state approaches to border security focuses on border maintenance which rely on the perspective of state territorial sovereignty and subjugate the idea of trans-national space. On the other, trans-nationalism has strengthened the construction of border itself. While regulation of state border at sea under the United Nations Convention of the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) is a modern invented concept since 1950s that overrule colonial construct, the logic of state to border maintenance proves to follow the colonial legacy. The state exercises the idea of territorialization of the sea to ensure their security at sea by taking threat perception in defining maritime security. In practice, compartment of state territorial sovereignty frequently generates conflict in trans-border (national) fishing. These issues will be addressed in this panel, seeking for possible strategies for the management of borders the midst of transnational flows of goods and people.

Call for Paper

ICSEAS maintain a rigorous selection process for papers by implementing a pre-conference abstract review. Abstract for oral presentation not exceeding 300 words typed in English are invited. Extended abstracts should be submitted by online submission at https://epaper.uasc.ugm.ac.id/.

IMPORTANT DATES

  • Abstract submission deadline : September 24th, 2016  October 1st, 2016
  • Notification of abstract submission : September 28th, 2016  October 4th, 2016
  • Full paper submission deadline : October 3rd, 2016  October 10th, 2016
  • Registration : September 29th – October 5th, 2016  October 4th – October 10th, 2016

Speakers of the Event

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER FOR PARALLEL THEMES
Dr. Shiskha Prabawaningtyas
“Challenges to Border Security ”
Dr. Shiskha Prabawaningtyas

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER FOR PARALLEL THEMES
I Made Andi Arsana, S.T.,M.E.,Ph.D.
“Challenges to Border Security ”
I Made Andi Arsana, S.T.,M.E.,Ph.D.

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER FOR PARALLEL THEMES
Dr. Jamhari, S.P.,M.P..
“Food Security and the Future of Southeast Asia”
Dr. Jamhari, S.P.,M.P.

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER FOR PARALLEL THEMES
Subejo, S.P.,M.Sc.,Ph.D. “Food Security and the Future of Southeast Asia”
Subejo, S.P.,M.Sc.,Ph.D.

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER FOR PARALLEL THEMES
Prof. Hiroyoshi Kano
“ Food Security and the Future of Southeast Asia ”
Prof. Hiroyoshi Kano

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER FOR PARALLEL THEMES
Dr. Satyawan Pudyatmoko, S.Hut., M.Agr.Sc.
“Climate Change and its Challenges”
Dr. Satyawan Pudyatmoko, S.Hut., M.Agr.Sc.

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER FOR PARALLEL THEMES
Dr. Pujo Semedi Hargo Yuwono, M.A.
“Climate Change and its Challenges”
Dr. Pujo Semedi Hargo Yuwono, M.A.

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER FOR PARALLEL THEMES
Dr. Linda Yanti Sulistiawati, S.H.,M.Sc.,Ph.D.
“Pluralism in a Democratic Southeast Asia”
Dr. Linda Yanti Sulistiawati, S.H.,M.Sc.,Ph.D.

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER FOR PARALLEL THEMES
Zainal Abidin Bagir, M.A., Ph.D.
“Pluralism in a Democratic Southeast Asia”
Zainal Abidin Bagir, M.A., Ph.D.

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER FOR PARALLEL THEMES
Dr. Erwan Agus Purwanto, M.Si.
“Challenges to Democracy”
Dr. Erwan Agus Purwanto, M.Si.

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER FOR PARALLEL THEMES
Prof. Simon Butt
“Challenges to Democracy”
Prof. Simon Butt

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER FOR PARALLEL THEMES
Dr. M. Mukhtasar Syamsudin
“Welfare and Poverty in an Unequal Society”
Dr. M. Mukhtasar Syamsudin

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER FOR PARALLEL THEMES
Prof. Wihana Kirana Jaya, M.Soc.Sc., Ph.D.
“Welfare and Poverty in an Unequal Societyy”
Prof. Wihana Kirana Jaya, M.Soc.Sc., Ph.D.

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER FOR PARALLEL THEMES
Supra Wimbarti, M.Sc.,Ph.D.
“Equality and New Categories of Discrimination”
Supra Wimbarti, M.Sc.,Ph.D.

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER
Prof. Dr. Janianton Damanik, M.Si.
“Issues of Sovereignty and Security”
Day 2, 14th October 2016
Prof. Dr. Janianton Damanik, M.Si.

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER
Prof. Dr. Lasiyo, M.A., M.M.
“Issues of Sovereignty and Security”
Day 2, 14th October 2016
Prof. Dr. Lasiyo, M.A., M.M.

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER
Prof. Tri Widodo, M.Ec.Dev.,Ph.D.
“Identity and Spirit of ASEAN Community”
Day 1, 13th October 2016
Prof. Tri Widodo, M.Ec.Dev.,Ph.D.

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER
Prof. Dr. Purwo Santoso, M.A.
“Identity and Spirit of ASEAN Community”
Day 1, 13th October 2016
Prof. Dr. Purwo Santoso, M.A.

Speaker
KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Arif Havas Oegroseno, S.H., LL.M.
Deputy Coordinating Minister of Maritime Affairs and Resources of Indonesia
“Indonesian Practice on Maritime Border Security”
Arif Havas Oegroseno, S.H., LL.M.

Speaker
KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Dr. Nur Hassan Wirajuda
15th Foreign Minister of Indonesia (2001-2009)
“What’s next for ASEAN, the Future of Regional Cooperation ?”
Dr. Nur Hassan Wirajuda

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER
Prof. Dr. Paschalis Maria Laksono, M.A.
“Issues of Sovereignty and Security”
Day 2, 14th October 2016
Prof. Dr. Paschalis Maria Laksono, M.A.

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER
Prof. Dr. Peter Carey
“Issues of Sovereignty and Security”
Day 2, 14th October 2016
Prof. Dr. Peter Carey

Speaker

INVITED SPEAKER
Prof. Yang Soung Yoon
“Identity and Spirit of ASEAN Community”
Day 1, 13th October 2016
Prof. Yang Soung Yoon

Conference Schedule

Day 1
  • 08.00 - 08.30 - Registration

  • 08.30 - 09.00 - Opening Ceremony

  • 09.00 - 10.00 - Keynote Speech 1

  • 10.00 - 12.00 - Parallel Session 1

  • 12.00 - 13.00 - Lunch Break

  • 13.00 - 15.00 - Parallel Session 2

  • 15.00 - 17.00 - Plenary Session 1

Day 2
  • 08.00 - 10.00 - Parallel Session 3

  • 10.00 - 11.00 - Keynote Speech 2

  • 11.00 - 13.00 - Lunch Break

  • 13.00 -15.00 - Parallel Session 4

  • 15.00 - 15.30 - Break

  • 15.30 - 17.30 - Plenary Session 2

  • 17.30 - 18.00 - Closing

Conference Venue

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About UGM

Universitas Gadjah Mada (internationally known as Gadjah Mada University ; Abbreviation : UGM) is an Indonesian public ivy league research university located in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, founded on December 19, 1949. UGM is the oldest and largest institution of higher learning in Indonesia. Located in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, the 360 acre university comprises of 18 faculties, 68 undergraduate study programs, 23 diploma study programs, 104 master and spesialist study program, and 43 Doctorate study programs.

It has approximately 55,000 students, 1,187 foreign students and 2,500 faculty members currently. Universitas Gadjah Mada has been considered to be one of the most prestigious universities in Indonesia.

UGM is implementing an educopolis area, a step taken by universities in creating conducive environment for the continuity of the learning process. These efforts are pursued in the context of developing multidisciplinary collaborations and responding to ecological issues in order to achieve the vision of the university. Some of the steps are reducing pollution and vehicle exhaust emissions, development of pedestrian, restriction of vehicles entering the campus, construction of new dormitories on the campus, development of parking pockets, planting the trees green and many more.

The Special Region of Yogyakarta of where UGM is located, is one of the smallest provinces in Indonesia and has been widely known as a center of Javanese culture as well as a center of learning. It has 3,400,000 inhabitants, 511,000 of whom reside in the city of Yogyakarta. Its designation as a center of learning is marked by the existence of 120 state and private tertiary educational institutions, with a student population of over 300,000.

Official website : http://ugm.ac.id

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Registration Fees

Payment Entitlements :

  • Participants/delegates are charged based on their institution/affiliation not nationality of first author.
  • Cancellations are not allowed, and return of payment is not possible.
  • Extra one paper is only applicable for the same first author.
  • The Registration Fee should be excluded the transfer fee and bank charges. Bank transfer fee/charge should be paid by the participants.
  • Registration fee includes seminar materials, lunch, attending all technical sessions and publication process.
  • At least one author for each accepted full paper must register.
Payment Procedure EN Payment Procedure ID

International Participants

Free
  • Registration Fee
  • First Paper : USD 250/paper
  • Extra Paper : USD 150/paper
  • Participant Only : USD 250/participant
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Local/Domestic Participants

USD75
  • Registration Fee
  • First Paper : IDR 2.500.000/paper
  • Extra Paper : IDR 1.500.000/paper
  • Participant Only : IDR 2.500.000/participant
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